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  • Encouraging Imagination in Children
  • Post author
    penne whyte

Encouraging Imagination in Children

Encouraging Imagination in Children

Children need many stimuli when growing up, they need to engage in read and writing and in sports. They need to be able to socialise with friends and teachers, and they need to be comfortable to just be with themselves.

For children to be able to play alone and entertain themselves they are inadvertently learning. The best start for children is to grow their imagination. Kids may like to race their cars along the hallway floorboards, or dress up their favourite teddy for a teddy bears picnic. The process of pretending is growing their developmental skills.

Children learn in a safe environment how to talk and how to think, how many times have you listened to your kids while they play by themselves. They talk to their cars or their teddies, they do role-plays and experiment with social situations. It is a great learning for their future endeavours in these situations.

Kids try-out with different ways to problem solve, when they play independently and these skills are invaluable in a social setting.

Imaginary play allows kids to think from another perspective, they can allow themselves to be super heroes or to be mums or doctors. They can learn what is it like to feed a baby or to help a teddy bear that has a broken leg. Kids often act out real life situations with imaginary play and this is all about them learning to deal with these situations and will only strengthen their resilience. For kids who play super heroes or astronauts etc, they are able to learn to look after people and save people and do things they may never see in real life.

It is important to nurture this entertainment and provide as much or as little space as your child needs to create a pretend world for itself.

You child may like to build a cubby house on their own or they many need assistance, but once it is up its good to give them some time to role play alone before you join in.

As kids grow up this imagination changes, their needs and developments change. Through Willow’s Fairyland you can keep this imagination going while helping them navigate the complexity of life. And sadly this starts at a younger and younger age.
  • Post author
    penne whyte